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Disease Outbreak Alerts

Updates on current disease outbreaks are listed here as they occur and will include the date listed, disease name, location and current status. Specific premises will not be named but the general location by town, county and state will be listed. When locations, events or horses are at risk they will be listed. Updates will be posted as they are received.


Date Disease Location Status
May 15, 2015 Equine Herpes Viruses Marion and Polk counties, OR Confirmed case(s): Quarantine
May 14, 2015... There have been no additional cases of horses infected with Equine Herpes Virus (EHV-1) this week, according to State Veterinarian Dr. Brad LeaMaster of the Oregon Department of Agriculture. Over the previous two weeks, nine horses had either developed neurological signs of the infection or had developed fevers with no neurological signs after being exposed to EHV-1. All horses involved remain under active observation by owners and their veterinarians. Eight farms remain under quarantine, six in Marion County and two in Polk County. There have been no deaths associated with the EHV-1 outbreak so far. Two horses that were hospitalized at Oregon State University College of Veterinary Medicine’s Large Animal Hospital have responded to treatment and have been sent home. “The fact that there have been no new reports of the virus in Oregon is encouraging news and may indicate that the outbreak situation has stabilized,” says LeaMaster. All affected horses have been linked to an Oregon High School Equestrian Team (OHSET) meet at the Linn County Fairgrounds on April 16-19. “I am aware that many equine shows and other events have been cancelled or postponed this past week” says Brad LeaMaster. “It is a very tough decision to make, however, I commend those event organizers who made that call as well as the many horse owners who decided to just stay home. That was a responsible thing to do and I feel that those actions have been the key reason for no new infections being reported this past week.” ODA has received many inquiries from concerned horse owners on what to do if they have a potentially exposed horse. “Our recommendation is to isolate the animal and contact your veterinarian to discuss how best to monitor for signs of sickness as well as biosecurity details” says LeaMaster. Another frequently asked question is about the length of time for the quarantine to be in place. The eight premises under state quarantine will remain so for 28 days after the last infection.
May 15, 2015 Vesicular Stomatitis Maricopa, Yavapai, AZ Confirmed case(s): Quarantine
May 13, 2015---Since the last situation report (5/4/15), six (6) new confirmed VSV-positive premises (New Jersey serotype) and nine (9) new suspect premises have been identified and quarantined in Maricopa County, Arizona. Additionally, there are two (2) new VSV-suspect premises under quarantine in Yavapai County, Arizona. Quarantined premises are eligible for release 14 days after the onset of lesions in the last affected animal on the premises. Since the last situation report (5/4/15), one premises in Otero County, New Mexico and one premises in Kane County, Utah have been released from quarantine. There are currently no premises under quarantine in New Mexico.
May 14, 2015 Equine Infectious Anemia Edgar County, IL Confirmed case(s): Quarantine
On Thursday May 7, the Bureau of Animal Health and Welfare received confirmation that a horse stabled in Edgar County has tested positive for Equine Infectious Anemia. The horse has been quarantined to the premises, and arrangements are being made for the disposition of the infected animal. In addition, all other equine on the premises will be tested. Bureau personnel will be conducting area surveillance testing of horses within a 1.5 mile radius of the quarantined premises. If additional infected animals are disclosed, the surveillance area will be expanded. History provided by the owner indicates that the infected horse has not been tested in recent years and has not been moved from the premises within the past couple of years. Horse owners are reminded that Equine Infectious Anemia can be transferred via contact with infected blood. Owners are encouraged to use appropriate insect control on animals and in and around buildings to decrease the possibility of exposure to biting insects. The sharing of needles between horses should always be avoided and equipment such as dental floats and bits should be properly disinfected before being used on other horses.
May 14, 2015 Equine Herpes Viruses Northeast Ill, IL No Status
On Friday May 8, the Bureau of Animal Health and Welfare was notified that two horses located in a stable in Northeast Illinois tested positive for EHV-1 via the nasal swab PCR test. Additional horses at the same stable had exhibited fevers throughout the week of May 4. Three horses have exhibited neurologic signs of disease and two of those horses have been euthanized. All horses on the premises have been restricted to the stable and are being monitored daily for signs of disease. Stable personnel have been instructed to eliminate direct contact between horses as much as possible and to segregate sick horses from healthy horses as well as limit personnel entering the barn. The stable manager has implemented enhanced cleaning and disinfection measures to help decrease the possibility of exposure. A source of the initial exposure has not been identified. It was also reported to the Bureau that several horses from this stable attended equine events on or about April 25th and on May 2nd. These venues have been contacted and are implementing steps to reduce the chances of additional exposures.
May 14, 2015 Equine Herpes Viruses Warren County, IA Confirmed case(s): Quarantine
May 13, 2015---DES MOINES – The Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship today announced that a horse stable in Warren County has had several confirmed cases of Equine Herpesvirus Myeloencephalopathy (EHM). EHM is the neurological disease associated with Equine Herpesvirus (EHV). There is no human health threat from the disease. All horses at the facility are being monitored for the disease and are not permitted to leave the site. EHV is spread by direct horse-to-horse contact or through contact with objects contaminated with the virus. This can include tack, grooming equipment and feed and water buckets. Signs of the disease include fever, decreased coordination, failure to maintain balance, lethargy and inability to rise.
May 12, 2015 Vesicular Stomatitis Arizona and Utah, AZ Confirmed case(s): Quarantine
On May 1, 2015, the National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL), confirmed findings of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection (New Jersey serotype) on premises in Maricopa County, Arizona and Kane County, Utah. Three horses on two premises in Maricopa County, Arizona met the case definition of infection with compatible clinical signs and positive complement fixation antibody titers. One mule on a premises in Kane County, Utah met the case definition of infection with compatible clinical signs and positive virus isolation. These are the 2015 VSV index cases for Arizona and Utah, respectively. Additionally, a second premises in Kane County, Utah is under VSV quarantine related to the index case. The equids involved in the Kane County, Utah case had moved from Arizona just prior to identification of clinical signs. In addition to the two confirmed premises in Maricopa County, Arizona, there are five suspect premises in Arizona under movement control for suspicion of VSV. Quarantined premises are eligible for release 14 days after the onset of lesions in the last affected animal on the premises. Since the last situation report (4/29/15), one premises in Grant County, New Mexico has been released from quarantine.
May 07, 2015 Vesicular Stomatitis Kane County, UT Ongoing Investigation
5-7-2015--(Mt. Carmel, Utah) Tests conducted by the National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) in Ames, Iowa, have confirmed the finding of vesicular stomatitis (VS) in one mule located in Kane County. Four other horses are showing symptoms of VS and are undergoing tests. An additional nine horses may have had contact with the mule and four horses. All of the suspect animals are in isolation and under quarantine. The infected animals traveled from Arizona, where additional cases of VS have been recently confirmed, and arrived in Utah with some of the animals showing symptoms. The confirmation of the disease has prompted a mandatory quarantine of all 14 animals by Acting State Veterinarian, Dr. Warren Hess. The VS discovery comes during the Mt. Carmel XP horse endurance/trail event held April 29th to May 3rd, 2015. All participants in the event are encouraged to examine their animals for signs of vesicular stomatitis and report any symptoms to your local veterinarian, or the Utah Department of Agriculture and Food at: (801) 538-4910.
May 06, 2015 Equine Herpes Viruses Polk and Marion Counties, OR Confirmed case(s): Quarantine
May 4, 2015--Four Oregon horses have now tested positive for Equine Herpes Virus (EHV-1) with two of the horses showing neurological symptoms, according to the Oregon Department of Agriculture. It was confirmed last week that a Marion County horse had tested positive for EHV-1 and had developed neurological symptoms. The second horse that developed neurological symptoms resided at a stable in Polk County with about 40 other horses and was taken to the Large Animal Hospital at Oregon State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine over the weekend. The Polk County stable has been placed under quarantine and the remaining horses are being monitored by the stable manager and a veterinarian. In addition to the Polk County stable, two Marion County farms remain under quarantine due to exposure to EHV-1. The infected horses and other horses exposed at the quarantined facilities attended an Oregon High School Equestrian Team (OHSET) meet at the Linn County Fairgrounds on April 16-19. ODA is currently investigating the potential of any additional exposures at this time. In addition, ODA is working to notify owners of horses that have been potentially exposed and has notified Oregon equine veterinarians.
May 04, 2015 Equine Infectious Anemia Henderson County, TN Investigation Initiated
NASHVILLE—The state veterinarian is advising horse owners of four confirmed cases of equine infectious anemia (EIA) in West Tennessee. Four horses stabled at three locations in Henderson County recently tested positive for EIA. A second round of screening confirmed the positive results. State officials are now testing additional horses that stabled with or live near the infected horses. EIA is a viral disease most commonly transmitted by biting insects. At this time, there is no vaccine or treatment. Although an infected horse can run a low-grade fever or become lethargic, often there are no clinical signs. A horse remains infected throughout its lifetime and can pass the disease to other horses. Owners of EIA-positive horses have two options: lifetime quarantine of the animal or euthanasia.
May 04, 2015 Vesicular Stomatitis Grant County; Otero County, NM No Status
On April 29, 2015, the National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) in Ames, Iowa, confirmed a finding of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection (New Jersey serotype) on a premises in Grant County, New Mexico. One horse on the premises has met the case definition of infection with compatible clinical signs and a four-fold change in positive complement fixation antibody titers. This is the 2015 VSV index case for the United States. Additionally, a horse on a second premises located in Otero County, New Mexico has met the subsequent premises case definition of VSV infection (New Jersey serotype) with compatible clinical signs and positive complement fixation antibody titer. Therefore, there are currently a total of two (2) VSV-positive premises under quarantine in New Mexico.